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Competition Reports

Written by dwight normile    Wednesday, 31 October 2018 12:43    PDF Print
Russia's Artur Dalaloyan Wins All-Around In Doha
(4 votes, average 4.00 out of 5)

In the Aspire Dome at the 2018 World Championships in Doha, Qatar, Russia’s Artur Dalaloyan won the all-around final, tying Xiao Ruoteng of China with 87.598 apiece. But they take the top five scores, so Dalaloyan won the gold. Xiao, who won the the all-around in Montreal last year, won silver.

Dalaloyan placed first on rings (14.533), second on floor exercise (14.800) and parallel bars (15.566), and third on high bar (14.166).

Nikita Nagornyy, also Russian, claimed the bronze with 86.331. All three medalists went six-for-six.

Sun Wei (China) placed fourth with 85.898, and five-time U.S. champion Sam Mikulak placed fifth with 85.273.

Mikulak was having the meet of his life, placing third on pommel horse (14.300) and third on parallel bars (15.441). Then disaster struck on high bar. He caught his second release (Kolman) a little close and had to pike his giant over the top. But the biggest blow was a Tkatchev to Tkatchev-half to mixed grip (Moznik). He placed fifth with 85.273.

A similar issue happened to Mikulak at the 2013 World Championships in Antwerp, Belgium. And once again he was ambushed on high bar. He shot too low on his Takemoto and ended up doing two extra giants in a mixed grip. He was in a position to medal but he placed sixth.

"Just probably (the) biggest disappointment,” Mikulak said. “I thought this was my year, and had it in my grasp and just let it go. My goal is to get individual medals; all-around is definitely the one I wanted the most.”

Said Yul Moldauer, Mikulak’s teammate: “(Sam) has worked so hard. I can’t even imagine what’s going through his head." Moldauer placed 12th (81.932), lacking the difficulty to contend. He also fell off pommel horse.

The sixth through 10th in order were Kazuma Kaya (Japan) 84.765; Kenzo Shira (Japan) 84.531; James Hall (Great Britain) 84.298; Artur Davtyan (Armenia) 83.140; and Marias Georgiou (Cypress) 82.032.

Ukrainian Oleg Vernyayev had a huge lead after parallel bars, but high bar ruined his chances for gold. He went the wrong way on a Takemoto and put his hands down on his layout double-double. He placed 14th with 81.564.

Read complete coverage of the 2018 World Championships in the December issue of International Gymnast.

To subscribe to the print and/or digital edition, or to order back issues of International Gymnast magazine, click here.

 
Written by dwight normile    Tuesday, 30 October 2018 12:29    PDF Print
Six-Time World Champions!
(7 votes, average 4.71 out of 5)

Simone Biles and company won their sixth World Championships, defeating second-place Russia. The Americans scored 171.629 and the Russians tallied 162.863, a winning margin of 8.766. Biles, of course did all four events. She also totaled 14.866 on uneven bars, the highest score of the Team Finals. Biles also had the highest vault score (15.500) and the best score on floor exercise (14.766). Kara Eaker performed only on balance beam, but her score there was the highest, as well (14.333).

Brazil was in third place after the third rotation, when China was in seventh and Canada occupied last place in the eight-team final China claimed the bronze medal (162.396) and Canada placed fourth (161.644). Both China and Canada finished on vault, one of the highest scoring events.

In order of finish were France (161.294); Japan (160.262); Brazil (159.830); and Germany (159.428).

"It’s very exciting because we put in a lot of hard work … into our performances tonight,” Biles said. “We hold ourselves to high expectations every time we step on the mat, so it’s a little bit scary, even when we have mistakes … (people say) you guys are going to win anyways. But it’s our personal performance is how we feel rather than the scoreboard.”

Read complete coverage of the 2018 World Championships in our December issue of International Gymnast.

To subscribe to the print and/or digital edition, or to order back issues of International Gymnast magazine, click here.

 
Written by Christian Ivanov    Monday, 29 October 2018 14:05    PDF Print
China Regains Number One
(6 votes, average 5.00 out of 5)

In a thrilling contest until the last routine of the competition, China edged Russia (256.634 to 256.585) by a margin of .049 to win the men’s team title at the Doha World Championships. Thanks to Zou Jinqyuan’s incredible parallel bars routine, which received a 16.2/7.0 (the highest score here in Doha), China had built near a full point lead going into the last rotation, high bar. Three hit routine for China would have sealed the deal, but the last competitor, Xiao Ruoteng missed his Liukin (full-twisting Tkatchev) and gave a chance to the Russians. A perfectly hit routine by Nikita Nagornyy would have done it, but he bent his arms on a front giant after his layout Tkatchev-half, and his score of 13.733 was just short of what the team needed.

With the compelling three-up-three-count format, China had to count falls early in the competition on floor and pommel horse, but slowly it gained momentum as the day progressed. China’s p-bar total was nearly three points higher than the next best and put the team in the winning circle.  China last won the team title on home soil in Nanning in 2014, but lost to Japan and Great Britain in 2015 in Glasgow.

The Russian team, which had entered the competition with the top qualifying score, posted the highest team totals on floor, rings and vault, but untidy routines on pommel horse and a fall on p-bars by Arthur Dalaloyan (peach on one rail mount) cost the team.  Despite losing the gold by the narrowest of margins, the Russian team, who last won a team medal at worlds in 2006, was in good spirits.

Defending champion Japan, led by Kohei Uchimura, who competed four events for the team, took the bronze posting a 253.744.  Japan was having a great competition until Yusuke Tanaka’s p-bar routine, where he struggled on his unique Makuts coming from a peach position and scored mere 11.566.  Had he posted the score he earned in qualification, 14.833, Japan could have won the title.

The spirited team of the U.S., led by Sam Mikulak, was in the mix for the bronze until the very end of the competition. But when Japan’s Kenzo Shirai hit a floor routine for the top score of the day (14.933), the U.S. had to settle for fourth place.  With Mikulak competing on all six events, the U.S. had a really strong competition counting only one fall (pommel horse), but their lower difficulty on some of the routines turned out to be a factor at the end.

Great Britain started the competition well, hitting rings and vault, but errors on p-bars and high bar pushed them down in the rankings and they placed fifth. Switzerland, Brazil and the Netherlands rounded out the rest of the field placing sixth, seventh and eighth, respectively.

To subscribe to the print and/or digital edition, or to order back issues of International Gymnast magazine, click here.

 
Written by dwight normile    Monday, 29 October 2018 13:31    PDF Print
Can The U.S. Women's Team Win Its Sixth World Title?
(3 votes, average 5.00 out of 5)

Now that Simone Biles is back and better than ever, the U.S. women’s team can likely be on cruise control. The women’s team final is tomorrow, October 30, and the squad of Biles, Morgan Hurd, Riley McCusker, Grace McCallum and Kara Eaker will attempt to win its sixth world title.

Their first was on home soil, at the 2003 World Championships in Anaheim. The team’s second was the 2007 Worlds in Stuttgart.

The next three were consecutive: 2011 (Tokyo), 2014 (Nanning) and 2015 (Glasgow).

The other teams in the women’s Team Final: Russia (paired with the U.S. on vault); China and Canada (uneven bars); Brazil and Japan (balance beam); and France and Germany (floor exercise).

In you’re a betting person, put your money on the Americans.

Read complete coverage of the 2018 World Championships in the December issue.

To subscribe to the print and/or digital edition or to order back issues of International Gymnast magazine, click here.


 

 
Written by Admin    Monday, 29 October 2018 06:45    PDF Print
Can The Japanese Men's Team Go Back-To-Back?
(1 vote, average 5.00 out of 5)

The Japanese men’s team are the defending World Champions, having won the 2015 Worlds in Glasgow, Scotland.

Years ago they won five consecutive World Championships: 1962 (Prague), ’66 (Dortmund), ’70 (Ljubljana), ’74 (Varna) and ’78 (Strasbourg).

Japan also won five straight Olympic Games: 1960 (Rome), ’64 (Tokyo), ’68 (Mexico City), ’72 (Munich) and ’76 (Montreal). They also won the team title and the 2004 Olympics in Athens. That’s quite a dynasty.

Read the complete coverage of the 2018 World Championships in Doha, Qatar, in the December issue of International Gymnast.

To subscribe to the print and/or digital edition or to order back issues of International Gymnast magazine, click here.

 


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